Category Archives: Food

Delicious Baumkuchen Cakes

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo Japan

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo Japan

While traveling in Japan, I can’t help but stop and enjoy all the wonderful foods I come across.  My favorite foods are, of course all of the sweet desserts!

While I was in Tokyo Haneda Airport, I encountered this delicious, delicate baumkuchen cake at Nenrinya Bakery.

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo, Japan Photo Credit: David Keisilng

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo, Japan
Photo Credit: David Keisilng

The Japanese people have adopted this lovely German layer cake as one of their own favorite desserts.  Baked uniquely with each layer of the batter brushed on while rotating on a spit, each layer browned before adding another layer.

Baumkuchen, Nenrinya Bakery Photo Credit: David Keisling

Baumkuchen, Nenrinya Bakery Photo Credit: David Keisling

You can actually watch the cakes being made fresh in the window. Which is how I, discovered these lovely cakes.

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo, Japan. Photo Credit: David Keisling

Nenrinya Bakery Haneda Airport, Tokyo, Japan.
Photo Credit: David Keisling

They even have sandwiches, where the buns are the cakes!

Hamburger baumkuchen Photo Credit: David Keisling

Baumkuchen sandwiches
Photo Credit: David Keisling

These cakes make great gifts to bring back home.

Baumkuchen Cakes makes great gifts Photo Credit: David Keisling

Baumkuchen Cakes makes great gifts
Photo Credit: David Keisling

You can find there bakery locations here:


Ota-ku, Tokyo Haneda Airport 3-4-2 Haneda Airport Terminal 2 in the starting gate number 51 boarding preoral
TEL 03-6428-8710
Hours 6:00 to 20:00

Ota-ku, Tokyo Haneda Airport 3-3-2 Haneda Airport Terminal 1 2F specialties sweets Museum                                                                                                                     TEL 03-575-7178                                                                                                          Hours 6:00 to 20:00

  

Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 1-9-1 JR Tokyo Station premises Yaesu central opening in the ticket                                                                                                       TEL 03-5293-4427 [rings home Customer Service Center: TEL 03-3316-2356]
Hours 6:30 to 21:30

Saitama Urawa-ku Higashitakasago cho 11-1 Daimaru Urawa Parco B1
TEL 048-615-6020
Hours 10:00 to 21:00

Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 5-chome, 6-15 seat STONE [The Stone] 1F
TEL 03-5537-3910
Seven days a week Hours [Mon-Sat] 10:30 to 20:00, [day and a public holiday] 10:30 to 19:00

Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 1-9-1 Daimaru Tokyo first floor
TEL 03-3212-8011 (dies)
Hours [Mon-Fri] 10:00 to 21:00, [Saturday, Sunday and public holidays] 10:00 to 20:00

Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Nishi-ku, Takashima 2-18-1 Sogo Yokohama underground second floor
TEL 045-465-2111 (dies)
Hours 10:00 to 20:00

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&u=http://nenrinya.jp/shop/index.html&prev=search

http://www.nenrinya.jp

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Ozoni “Japanese New Years Soup” recipe

 

Marc Matsumoto's Ozoni photo credit from  http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/ozoni/

Marc Matsumoto’s Ozoni photo credit from
http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/ozoni/

New Years in Japan is called Oshogatsu, お正月 (おしょうがつ – oshōgatsu) it is the most important day that’s celebrated in Japan.  Steep in traditions that goes back hundreds of years, you will still find many Japanese today continuing the same traditions.

On January 1, millions of Japanese visit shrines or temples, offering up a prayer, usually for good health and good fortune.  It is also customary to eat Ozoni the Japanese New Years soup.  This Japanese New Years soup is eaten on the first day of the new year.  Marc Matsumoto a food blogger, shares his family recipe for Ozoni.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water + 4 cups water
  • 4 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 pound boneless chicken thighs
  • 8 slices carrot, carved into the shape of a cherry blossom
  • 1/4 cup sake
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 small bunch spinach, lightly boiled and drained
  • mochi
  • yuzu

Directions

  1. About an hour before you prepare your Ozoni, put 1 cup of water in a bowl along with the dried shiitake mushrooms. 
  2. Put the chicken in a colander. Boil a kettle of water and pour it over the chicken, letting the water go down the drain. This removes blood and impurities from the meat, giving you a clear soup. 
  3. Put the chicken in a pot along with the remaining 4 cups of water, the carrots, sake, and salt, and then simmer for 20 minutes, skimming to remove any scum that rises to the top. Remove the chicken and set it aside. 
  4. Add the soy sauce, along with the soaking liquid from the shiitake mushrooms to the soup and then adjust salt to taste. Slice up the shiitake mushrooms and add them to the soup. 
  5. Lay down a sheet of aluminum foil in a toaster oven then toast the mochi until it inflates and turns golden brown along the top. You can also just microwave it until it inflates.
  6. To serve, place piece of grilled mochi at the bottom of the bowl, then add a few slices of chicken. Gather a few strands of spinach and tie them in loop and place in the bowl. Add the soup along with two slices of carrot and some shiitake mushrooms. Garnish with some yuzu zest and serve.

Tips/Techniques

If you can’t find yuzu, you can substitute Meyer orange peel

View Marc Marc Matusmoto’s original family recipe 

 

 

Ramen Heaven! Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku (Republic)

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Hands down Sapporo has the BEST Ramen EVER!!!  Hokkaido, the most Northern Island of Japan is famous for ramen.  Because it is very cold most of the year, ramen is very popular there. While visiting Sapporo recently, I bumped into a Ramen Village.  I was in Heaven!  These nostalgically themed ramen restaurants are located on the 10th floor of the Esta Shopping Center, Sapporo JR Station.  There are eight different nostalgic ramen restaurants that represents four different prefectures of Hokkaido.  Only the best of the best are here: Asahikawa, Hakodate, Kushiro and of course Sapporo.  When your all done you can even shop at the souvenir shop.

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

 

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

 

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Sapporo Ramen Kyowakoku Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

 

Check out this little video clip

http://www.sapporo-esta.jp/page/ramen/index_movie_01.html

 

Located on the 10th floor, in the Esta Sapporo JR Tower shopping mall, check out there site here.

 

 

 

You might also find this interesting: Kai Japanese Ramen in Honolulu, Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin Restaurant

 

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Kai Japanese Ramen in Honolulu

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Kai Japanese Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

 

According to Wikipedia “the origin of ramen is unclear” no matter, the Japanese made it famous and well known today.  I have to admit, Im a true ramen girl, total ramen lover.  I’ve been spoiled as a child, and had only the best and true Sapporo Ramen, from Sapporo of course.  So, I’m very doubtful when I go eat at a ramen-ya, especially when they proclaim to specialize in “Hokkaido” or “Sapporo” style ramen.  To my surprise,  Kai Ramen was pretty darn good.  I ordered the the Shoyu Ramen (my favorite) the broth was thick or kotteri which is robust and very rich with flavor.  Their Curry was delicious, rich in color and flavor.  My husband ordered the mini curry and the portion was quite large considering its a mini.  My  son ordered the Goma Tan Tan Men the broth had a nutty flavor and was kotteri, thick and robust with flavor.  Their gyoza I was disappointed with, it was bland not much for taste at all.  Even the texture of the filling I was disappointed with.  This is my third time eating at Kai Ramen and I have ordered gyoza every time, hoping it would get better.  They just don’t make good gyoza in my opinion.  I have to warn you that the broth is really salty, so you need to drink a lot of water and since the bathroom is located in another building just behind the shop it is a little inconvenient.  Other than the gyoza, I love this simple little ramen-ya.  This little shop is located at 1430 Kona St, below Axis Hair Salon (The best Japanese Hair Salon in Hawaii).  Their hours of operation is 11:30 am to 9 pm daily.  They even have happy hour see picture below.  My family and I really enjoyed Kai Ramen and we hope you do too.  Let me know where your favorite ramen shop is, where ever it may be.  

See menu in english and japanese below.  

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Kai Japanese Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Kai Japanese Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

      

Shoyu Ramen @ Kai Ramen Honolulu Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Shoyu Ramen @ Kai Japanese Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Goma Tan Tan Men Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Goma Tan Tan Men @ Kai Japanese Ramen Honolulu Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Mini-curry @ Kai Ramen Honolulu Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Mini-curry @ Kai Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Gyoza @ Kai Ramen Honolulu  Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Gyoza @ Kai Ramen Honolulu
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Happy Hour  Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

Happy Hour
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

 

 

 

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin Restaurant

A leisure stroll through Waikiki with my son and husband we ended up at Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin. A restaurant for tonkatsu lovers.  Tonkatsu a breaded deep fried pork cutlet often served with shredded cabbage.

We were quite impressed when we walked in.  The decor was cozy and welcoming, the restaurant was just at the end of their lunch rush when we sat down.  The menu was simple.  My husband was disappointed to find out that curry was not available.  Katsu Curry is served everyday until 4:30pm $15, but not on weekends or holidays.  We were there on a Sunday (figures).  Their Katsu Curry is also available on Tuesday and Wednesday nights for $17.  My husband ordered the hamburger plate. His order came with 2 small hamburger patties (it tastes very close to the ones from japan), salad and japanese soft cooked egg and of course rice and miso soup. It was delicious.  My son and I ordered the popular Ginza Tonkastu Set.  Ours came with Tonkatsu with a heap of shredded cabbage, rice and miso soup. The tonkatsu was absolutely amazing.  It was tender and juicy not dry, not over cooked. Wow! I was impressed.  The menu is quite pricey, but well worth it if your looking for authentic Japanese Tonkatsu in Waikiki.  Take out is available. You will find them in Waikiki at 255 Beachwalk. For more information on their hours or on parking, please call them at 808-926-8082  or check out their FaceBook for more information.

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin’s popular Tonkatsu Set
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin’s Hamburger Set
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin’s Tonkatsu Sauce
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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My Husband, youngest son and me.Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com 

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I can never get them to take a serious picture
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Yup, thats me in the background
Photo Credit: ionasiatrend.com

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Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin
Located in Waikiki at 255 Beachwalk

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Oshogatsu, a Japanese New Years Tradition

New Year celebration in Japan is a very important holiday and is steep in tradition that goes back hundreds of years. Japanese call the New Year, Oshogatsu, お正月 (おしょうがつ – oshōgatsu). Today, New Year is celebrated on January 1, but before 1873, the Japanese observed the New Year according to the Chinese lunar calendar.

Some of these traditions still observed today, include bell ringing.  A few minutes before midnight on December 31, New Years Eve, Buddhist temples all over Japan will start ringing their bells.  This bell ringing will continue into the early hours of January 1, until a total of 108 bells are rung.  This symbolizes the 108 human sins according to Buddhists belief and ringing these bells rids worldly desires and sins during the previous year.  On January 1, millions of Japanese visit shrines or temples, this observation is called Hatsumode 初詣 (はつもうで – hatsumōde).  While at the temple the Japanese offer up a prayer, usually for good health and good fortune.  It is also customary to eat  おせち料理 (おせちりょうり – osechi ryōri) see Mark’s no recipes post about the traditional foods.

Children also look forward to otoshidama, a tradition in which money is given to kids a decorated envelope.

picture source: punipunijapan.com

punipunijapan shares other Japanese traditions see below:

Another tradition is sending New Year’s cards called年賀状 (ねんがじょう – nengajō) to friends and family to wish them a happy New Year.

Happy New Year in Japanese is 明けましておめでとうございます (akemashite omedetō gozaimasu)

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Mochitsuki Neko New Year’s Decoration

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Kadomatsu New Year’s Decoration

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Kagami Mochi New Years Decoration

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New Years Calendars from Japan

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New Years Jubako Lacquered Boxes

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Please see Marks No recipes for more interesting recipes guide http://norecipes.com/blog/osechi-ryori-japanese-new-years-food/

 

Ozoni: Japanese New Year’s Mochi Soup

photo/source Bebe Love Ozaku

photo/source Bebe Love Ozaku

 

What’s better than eating Ozoni on New Year? This Japanese soup with mochi called Ozoni was believed to be exclusive to the Samurai.  Often, it was cooked during field battles and thought to have been an important meal to the Samurai.  Eating Ozoni on New Years Day has become a tradition that goes back to the Muromachi period (1336-1573).  I want to thank Keitochan for posting how to make this traditional soup and posting a video on how mochi is made.  Check out the recipe and video at keitochansays.com